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Home News The US’s draft law on contact tracing apps is a step behind...

The US’s draft law on contact tracing apps is a step behind Apple and Google

Document Analysis NLP IA

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neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.058319898492312
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.41167935512763
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.32

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Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

Kahn and a group of colleagues recently published a book of proposals and commentaries on the ethics of digital contact tracing services.

“This needs to be driven by public health, which may or may not be the same as what Apple and Google have decided are the terms of contact.

America’s patchwork approach to rolling out official tracing apps—leaving each state to make its own decisions and build its own systems—makes the deployment of such services uniquely complicated.

Elsewhere around the world, governments and technologists have been working in close cooperation for several months to develop and roll out digital contact tracing systems.

While the Covid Tracing Tracker details the different approaches taken in various places—including India’s partly mandatory system and Iceland’s popular but largely uninfluential app—most countries have adopted the same process nationwide.

In Europe, existing consumer privacy legislation such as the GDPR, or General Data Protection Regulation, has meant that governments have largely developed and adopted these apps—including the Apple-Google protocols—without needing to write new laws to protect citizens.

Some—like the UK, France, Belgium and a few others—have taken a centralized approach: they’ve decided to take a lot of the information directly i“Different countries have chosen different approaches.

Some—like the UK, France, Belgium, and a few others—have taken a centralized approach: they’ve decided to take a lot of the information directly into government systems and then disperse out what they think people need,” he says.

“That’s acceptable under the GDPR, providing the governments follow appropriate safeguards and limit the usage of the information to just public health purposes.


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