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Friday, July 10, 2020

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Marvel at this amazing miniature model of an 1959 IBM mainframe computer

Document Analysis NLP IA

705
WORDS

WORDS
3:31
Reading Time

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positive
sentiment

Sentiment0.17739268947015
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.48180192264699
it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.50317796610169

Highlights

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Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

Computers have gotten a lot smaller since 1959, when IBM created the 1401 data processing system, touted as the world’s first affordable general purpose computer.

Nicolas Temese‘s miniature model of the IBM 1401 computer system.

Temese, who shared the photos of the incredibly detailed model on his Instagram account, chose not to use 3D printing for the project.

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Temese said he has been making miniatures for years, but nothing this serious or precise.

Temese’s model includes a punchcard reader, teeny tiny punchcards, two tape drives, a query console, central unit, a line printer, floating floor and even a tiny, bright yellow wheeled office chair.

‘The original gates had a backplane that was wire-wrapped by hand, and for around two months, I put it aside because I had no clue on how to do it in a convincing way,’ he admits.

‘It was a lot of work, making all those pins by hand, all the fake wires and the orange (SMS) cards, but I think the final look was very convincing.

He’s posted more photos of the build process online, with the SMS card unit build depicted here, and the office chair build depicted here.

‘I think people really like the little chair as well, since I think it’s a more relatable item for more people,’ he said.

Since he started posting his progress, he’s heard from numerous computer-industry veterans sharing memories of the real thing.

‘When I first started posting pictures online of my model, I wasn’t sure that many people would even know what it was,’ Temese admits.

I heard from people at IBM as well as people who worked on the original system, and it is really validating to me when they comment on it and appreciate the accuracy of it.

Temese says he’s still working on a few last details.

‘They have a working copy of the original 1401 over there,’ Temese said, ‘and I think my miniature will feel right at home.