85 F
New York
Friday, August 14, 2020

-

Home News How patients lose out: When politics cancel science

How patients lose out: When politics cancel science

Document Analysis NLP IA

712
WORDS

WORDS
3:33
Reading Time

Reading Time
neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.035667903525046
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.35370026798598
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.29273504273504

Highlights

RELEVANT
FREQ, RAKE or TFIDF
Entity
ORG
Entity
PERSON
Entity
PRODUCT
Entity
OTHER
Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

Last week, historian David Blight and history student Griffin Black attempted to score political points at my expense with a Washington Post op-ed headlined “Black people aren’t naturally vulnerable to COVID-19.

Blight and Black took issue with a recent NPR interview in which I mentioned that African Americans might be susceptible to COVID-19 complications because of acquired co-morbidities.

NPR host David Greene asked about the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African-Americans in New Orleans.

I replied that systemic racism might play a role, but as a physician, I thought there might be other explanations.

Obesity, hypertension and diabetes – 40% to 60% more common among African Americans than non-Hispanic whites – increase risk for COVID-19 complications.

I added that addressing obesity, diabetes, and hypertension may decrease risk of COVID-19 regardless of race.

Obesity, ACE receptors, COVID-19 are medical facts.

Anthony Fauci has also alluded to underlying medical conditions among African Americans as a possible explanation for increased mortality from COVID-19.

Yet Blight and Black equated the well-studied epidemiology of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, race, ACE receptors and COVID-19, with junk sciencespecifically, the quack 19th century phrenology phenomenon.

The historians said my remarks, which were based on medical literature, “reflect a bafflingly persistent belief in America: that our society has vanquished racism.

But Blight and Black declared it racist to apply accepted medical knowledge in an attempt to better understand COVID-19.

It is an attempt to deny science when it conflicts with a preferred political narrative.

Nobody can deny that systemic racism has existed and does exist.

The priority must be in preventing disease and healing the patient, not political narratives.

As a physician and as a political leader, my vocation is to bring help and healing to patients and constituents.

African Americans have borne an outsized burden from COVID-19.

To save lives, physiology must trump ideology.

Moralistic ignorance spouted by academic historians may win plaudits in their social circles, but it does nothing for souls fighting for their lives inside ICUs.

We should care more about saving lives than political correctness.