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Thursday, October 22, 2020

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Home Family Running a Virtual School on Chicago’s West Side

Running a Virtual School on Chicago’s West Side

Document Analysis NLP IA

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4:57
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neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.053027210884354
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.44958049886621
it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.53645833333333

Highlights

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Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

It is not just COVID-19 that afflicts the DePriest community.

”.

Chicago operates the nation’s third-largest public-school district, reaching more than three hundred and fifty thousand students in six hundred and forty-two schools.

Now in her third year in charge at DePriest, she has harnessed a network of volunteers, tutors, and funders to think creatively and deepen the school’s coffers.

One summer day, as she stood in a library storeroom among shelves stacked with copies of “Charlotte’s Web,” “The Old Man and the Sea,” “The Hate U Give,” and “To Kill a Mockingbird,” she explained that books are a precious commodity for a school like DePriest.

The abrupt shutdown of Chicago Public Schools, announced in March by the Illinois governor, J.

On any given day, barely half of the city’s students logged into their Google accounts for school, according to C.

Many children didn’t have pencils or notebooks.

Others didn’t have reliable Internet service or computers, although Chicago officials raced to deliver a hundred thousand devices to families.

This was particularly true in working-class Austin, where many parents were classified as essential workers and expected to report to their jobs.

Almost no one had taught online before or thought about how to virtually engage elementary-school children for an entire day.

Suddenly doing so was “a little scary, a little bit unreal,” Vivian Billups, a teacher at DePriest, recalled.

With only one week off after the school year ended, she plunged into a summer class with what are called “diverse learners.

One student was unable to connect to class with a computer, so Billups arranged for delivery of a work packet every two weeks.

Finding that students did not have supplies, she drew on donations from World Vision, a charity, and filled book bags with pens, notebooks, glue, pencils and sharpeners, paper clips, and coloring books.

The one in the den was for fifth graders.

The one on the patio was for fourth graders.

She started summer school at 8 A.

When students did not show up or failed to return from a break during the first week, she made sure that their parents knew.

(Student: “I’m working.

” Billups: “Why does the computer say you haven’t even opened the lesson?”) Students missed their friends, but several told her that they could concentrate better at home and were glad not to have to worry about bullies or what to wear.

A summer student with poor vision turned out to be a voracious reader.

Amid the demonstrations that followed the killing of George Floyd, in Minneapolis, she asked her students, “Do you know why they’re protesting?” They didn’t.

“I was able to connect students with real events,” she said.


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