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Home News Universities warned not to censor students' 'Lives matter' painted message

Universities warned not to censor students’ ‘Lives matter’ painted message

Document Analysis NLP IA

582
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2:54
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neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.07357677045177
subjective
redaction

Subjectivity0.50899343711844
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.32843137254902

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Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

Spirit Rock at James Madison University (WHSV-TV screenshot).

For example, at James Madison University, officials denounced the ‘defacement and vandalism’ of their Spirit Rock, because someone ‘forcibly’ removed the word ‘Black’ from a ‘Black Lives Mattermessage.

‘This defacement and vandalism does not constitute free speech and is not acceptable,’ the university warned.

‘Students with dueling viewpoints have attempted to make sure their messages on these objects come out on top – including by painting over their ideological opponents’ views with their own,’ the group said.

But now, in light of the Black Lives Matter movement, ‘universities have responded troublingly by threatening to close these areas and prosecute students who communicate disfavored views.

‘Historically, the menagerie of campus objects students paint with their chosen messages has been surpassed only by the diversity of expression manifested through these monuments,’ the organization said.

James Madison’s ‘free speech rock‘ has been an outlet for expression for years.

In addition, Kent State University officials are reviewing a complaint that ‘White Lives Matters‘ was written on its free speech rock.

Public universities are bound by the First Amendment and private universities by the promises of free speech they may have made to students and faculty.

The organization told the universities in its letters that restricting some speech could come ‘at the expense of its students’ First Amendment rights.

‘The act of painting and repainting the Rock, even if it covers up or alters a prior message, is expression protected by the First Amendment and may not be stifled by government actors,’ FIRE said.


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