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Home Business & Finance UK’s ICO downgrades British Airways data breach fine to £20M, after originally...

UK’s ICO downgrades British Airways data breach fine to £20M, after originally setting it at £184M – TechCrunch

Document Analysis NLP IA

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positive
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objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.4194885361552
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.425

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Summary (IA Generated)

One of the biggest data breaches in UK corporate history has been closed off by regulators not with a bang, but a whimper — as a result of Covid-19.

Today the Information Commissioner’s Office, the UK’s data watchdog, announced that it would be fining British Airways £20 million for a data breach in which the personal details of more than 400,000 customers were leaked after BA suffered a two-month cyberattack and lacked adequate security to detect and defend itself against it.

It had originally planned to fine BA nearly £184 million, but it reduced the penalty in light of the economic impact that BA (like other airlines) has faced as a result of Covid-19.

The major step down in the fine underscores what kind of an impact the coronavirus pandemic is having on regulations.

But in the case of the BA fine, we’re seeing the other side of the Covid-19 impact: regulators are taking a less hard line with penalties on companies that are already struggling.

That raises questions of how impactful their decisions are, and what kind of a precedent they are setting for future security and data protection neglect.

Even with the reduced penalty size, the ICO is sticking by its original conclusions:.

“As part of the regulatory process the ICO considered both representations from BA and the economic impact of COVID-19 on their business before setting a final penalty.

As a result, data from 429,612 customers and staff was leaked, including “names, addresses, payment card numbers and CVV numbers of 244,000 BA customers,” the ICO said, adding that the combined card and CVV numbers of 77,000 customers and card numbers only for 108,000 customers were also believed to be a part of the breach, as well as the usernames and passwords of BA employee and administrator accounts, and the usernames and PINs of up to 612 BA Executive Club accounts (these last two were also not completely verified, it seems).


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