31 F
New York
Wednesday, March 3, 2021

-

Home News heading must be banned until the age of 18

heading must be banned until the age of 18

Document Analysis NLP IA

1023
WORDS

WORDS
5:6
Reading Time

Reading Time
neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.052141397927915
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.4073602427535
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.48655913978495

Highlights

RELEVANT
FREQ, RAKE or TFIDF
Entity
ORG
Entity
PERSON
Entity
PRODUCT
Entity
OTHER
Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

There is an increasingly large body of evidence which has identified that small, repetitive collisions of the brain inside the skull cause this disease.

More high-profile players from England’s 1966 World Cup-winning squad are getting dementia and heading the soccer ball is to blame.

It is now time for a blanket ban on heading until the age of 18, and from then on it should be closely monitored and reduced.

Research has found that one particular form of dementia (known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE) seems to only exist among those who, as part of routine activities, incur these regular assaults to the brain.

This issue was touched upon in the improperly titled Will Smith movie Concussion (because the disease is located in thousands of small hits, not one big one) and the Netflix Documentary, Killer Inside, about the NFL player, Aaron Hernandez who suffered from CTE.

Jeff Astle, a member of England’s 1970 World Cup squad, became the first British soccer player confirmed to have died from CTE – classed as an industrial injury.

But it was only when England’s 1966 World Cup-winning heroes began to be diagnosed with dementia that the soccer world really took notice.

And while older balls got heavier when wet, they traveled slower and were less likely to be kicked to head height in games.

Recent studies show that heading the ball, even just 20 times in practice, causes immediate and measurable alterations to brain functioning.

These results have been confirmed in other heading studies and are consistent with research on repetitive impacts that occur from other sports such as downhill mountain biking, resulting from riding over rough terrain.

More worryingly, in a large study of former professional soccer players in Scotland, when compared to matched controls, players were significantly more likely to both be prescribed dementia medications and to die from dementia – with a 500% increase in Alzheimer’s.

In February 2020, the FA denied direct causation but followed what America had done five years earlier and changed its guidelines concerning heading the ball.

The current guidelines don’t stop children from heading the ball in matches, but they do forbid heading the ball as part of training until the age of 12 – when it is gradually introduced.

And the players union, the PFA, has now called for heading in training by professional players to be reduced and monitored.

The demands in this charter will be costly, as they concern aftercare for those with dementia and more expensive research into the issue.

But the most significant demand they make is to protect professional players from dementia by severely limiting header training to no more than 20 headers in any training session with at minimum of 48 hours between sessions involving heading.

These progressive policies should not be delayed by those in the sport, such as the medical head of world players’ union Fifpro, Dr Vincent Gouttebarge, who claimed that more research is required.

While media attention focuses largely on the tragedy of lost soccer heroes, this is a much larger problem for youth players.

01% of the people who play soccer in this country play at the professional level – but almost half of all children aged 11-15 play the game.

If children are permitted to head the ball between the ages of 12 and 18, this means six years of damaging behavior.

There is no logical reason for the ban on heading soccer balls in training to stop at the age 12.


131FansLike
3FollowersFollow
16FollowersFollow