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Home Health Pace launches out of private beta with a plan to scale virtual...

Pace launches out of private beta with a plan to scale virtual group therapy – TechCrunch

Document Analysis NLP IA

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redaction

Subjectivity0.36850294066203
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.39835164835165

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Summary (IA Generated)

class=frase1>One in five class=”nlp-common”>people have a mental health illness.

“Nobody is perfectly mentally healthy all the time,” said Jack Chou, Pace co-founder.

While diagnosable mental health conditions might get an individual medication or therapy, those that live in a grey space might still need resources to stay afloat.

After Chou experienced the detrimental effects of burnout while working for Pinterest and Affirm, and co-founder Cat Lee, formerly of Pinterest and Maveron, experienced a personal travesty, the former colleagues realized there needed to be a way to help people who didn’t fit squarely into one bucket.

So Pace, which launched out of private beta today, wants to address this fallacy by creating small-group training classes for people interested in taking care of their emotional and mental health.

The core of the product is a 90-minute live video group session once a week, delivered through Pace’s platform.

Then, Pace interviews a new user for 15 to 30 minutes to learn about what they hope to get out of the experience.

While it’s not trying to be a therapy replacement, the startup is looking for facilitators who are licensed in mental health practice.

Pace doesn’t follow any specific curriculum during the meetings, but instead uses the time for people to talk through their feelings.

Facilitators are licensed mental health clinicians, with the majority of the leaders being part-time or freelancers.

It plans to introduce asynchronous ways for group members to chat and stay in touch beyond the weekly class, as well as spend time building out a product that feels beyond a Zoom call.

25 billion valuation to connect employees to therapists and mental health services.

One of Pace’s closest competitors is Coa, which launched with $3 million in seed funding in October 2020.

The startup is similarly using small-group fitness culture and applying it to mental health.

Coa charges $25 for drop-in classes (sticking to that fitness class theme) while Pace charges $45 per week for the same group to meet for months at a time.

While Coa has licensed therapists, Pace has licensed mental health clinicians.

“Although all of Coa’s classes are facilitated by licensed therapists, Coa’s classes are different from group therapy,” Meyer said.

Both companies are still pre-launch, but Coa says it has 6,000 people on its waitlist.

Startups fail often, and in this case, that could mean leaving without once-critical support people who are depending on group therapy.

Going forward, the real winner in the mental health fitness space will come down to a thoughtful curriculum and a user experience that brings out vulnerability in people even over a virtual setting.


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