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Home News 1 in 7 children live in poverty in the US. Misplaced fears...

1 in 7 children live in poverty in the US. Misplaced fears over single mothers could be why.

Document Analysis NLP IA

794
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3:58
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neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.043408741795839
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.38732020667505
not certain if it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.21301775147929

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Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

One in seven American children live in poverty, according to the Center for American Progress.

Mitt Romney’s Family Security Act earlier this month centered child poverty in the national political conversation and drew praise from conservative and liberal sources alike.

Scott Winship, the director of poverty studies at the conservative think tank the American Enterprise Institute, also came out against the plan, citing concerns in an interview with the New York Times’s Ezra Klein that single mothers “could afford not to work.

In the Data for Progress/Vox poll, conducted February 12 to 15 among 1,169 likely voters, respondents were told that “some lawmakers in Congress are proposing creating a child allowance .

Data for Progress/Vox poll conducted February 12 to 15, 2021, among 1,169 likely voters.

In another Data for Progress poll, 68 percent support a child allowance plan, with strong majorities of Republicans, Democrats, and independents.

But when presented with the possibility that single mothers, who have historically been scapegoated as “welfare queens” might slightly reduce work hours, the American electorate showcases its long-held commitment to the so-called “dignity of work.

While Romney’s plan, introduced earlier this month, would be “one of the most generous child-benefit packages ever, regardless of political party,” as Matthews reported, it would only be $3,000 to $4,200 a year per child.

The plan would provide a flat monthly allowance to parents; those with kids up to 5 years old would get $350 a month, and those with kids between 6 and 17 would get $250 a month — certainly not enough to live off.

But the fact remains that Americans are receptive to scapegoating single parents (especially mothers) for not working or not working hard enough.

Previous polling by Vox and Data for Progress has explored how the American electorate’s commitment to ensuring “fairness” in how government benefits are distributed can undercut the effectiveness of these programs and harm millions of people in need.

It remains to be seen if fretting over single moms getting relief from the government wins out against the possibility of lifting millions of children out of poverty.


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