48.8 F
New York
Wednesday, April 21, 2021

-

Home News legal experts weigh in on ‘disturbing’ technology

legal experts weigh in on ‘disturbing’ technology

Document Analysis NLP IA

893
WORDS

WORDS
4:27
Reading Time

Reading Time
neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.0088500422341886
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.40542709323197
not certain if it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.1905737704918

Highlights

RELEVANT
FREQ, RAKE or TFIDF
Entity
ORG
Entity
PERSON
Entity
PRODUCT
Entity
OTHER
Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

It was recently revealed that in 2017 Microsoft patented a chatbot that, if built, would digitally resurrect the dead.

Using AI and machine learning, the proposed chatbot would bring our digital persona back to life for our family and friends to talk to.

But there are currently no laws governing digital reincarnation.

Your right to data privacy after your death is far from set in stone, and there is currently no way for you to opt-out of being digitally resurrected.

This legal ambiguity leaves room for private companies to make chatbots out of your data after you’re dead.

Microsoft’s chatbot would use your electronic messages to create a digital reincarnation in your likeness after you pass away.

Microsoft isn’t the only company to have shown an interest in digital resurrection.

The AI company Eternime has built an AI-enabled chatbot that harvests information – including geolocation, motion, activity, photos, and Facebook data – which lets users create an avatar of themselves to live on after they die.

It may be only a matter of time until families have the choice to reanimate dead relatives using AI technologies such as Eternime’s.

After all, it looks like a violation of the right to privacy to digitally resurrect someone whose body lies beneath a tombstone reading “rest in peace”.

In the EU, the law on data privacy only protects the rights of the living.

That leaves room for member states to decide how to protect the data of the dead.

The UK’s data protection laws have not.

Those terms fiercely protect the privacy of the dead.

The company argued that their terms of service were designed to protect the marine’s privacy.

One route to better postmortem data legislation is to follow the example of organ donation.

In the future, private companies may offer family members an agonizing choice: abandon your loved one to death, or instead pay to have them digitally revived.

It’s time we wrote the laws to govern this technology.


131FansLike
3FollowersFollow
16FollowersFollow