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Home News Border control systems are gearing up to use facial analysis tech

Border control systems are gearing up to use facial analysis tech

Document Analysis NLP IA

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redaction

Subjectivity0.37616134893913
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.37417218543046

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Summary (IA Generated)

Developments in global border control technologies are providing innovative ways to address issues relating to migration, asylum-seeking and the introduction of illegal goods into countries.

But while governments and national security can benefit from this, advanced surveillance technology creates risks for the misuse of personal data and the violation of human rights.

This likely entails the use of infrared cameras, motion sensors, facial recognition, biometric data, aerial drones and radar.

Under the Trump administration, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE) partnered with controversial data analytics firm Palantir to link tip-offs from police and citizens with other databases, in a bid to arrest undocumented people.

The iBorderCtrl test analysed the facial micro-gestures of travelers crossing international borders at three undisclosed airports, with the aim of determining whether travelers were lying about the purpose of their trip.

Europe’s border and coastguard agency Frontex has also been investing in border control technology for several years.

Since last year, Frontex has operated unmanned drones to detect asylum-seekers attempting to enter various European states.

While Australia has been slower to implement enhanced surveillance at maritime borders, in 2018 the federal government announced it would spend A billion on six long-range unmanned drones to monitor Australian waters.

SmartGates at many international airports use facial recognition to verify travelers’ identities against data stored in biometric passports.

It combines authentication technology with biometrics to match the faces and fingerprints of people who wish to travel to Australia.

But data misuse by governments is well documented.

Refugees in various countries, including Kenya and Ethiopia, have had their biometric data collected for years.

In 2017, Bangladeshi Industry Minister Amir Hossain Amu said the government was collecting biometric data from Rohingya people in the country to “keep record” of them and send them “back to their own place”.

Technologies such as iBorderCtrl undermine the rights of migrants, asylum-seekers and all international travelers.

Facial recognition technology has already been found to be capable of bias against people of colour.

Enlisting this at airports and maritime borders — where human rights have historically been undermined on the basis of race — could be disastrous.

The good news is many people are now speaking out against how border control technologies can impact migrants, refugees and other travelers.

This gives the Australian Border Force extensive powers to search devices carried by people travelling internationally.

Last year the government recommended the legislation be amended so agencies can’t authorize the detention of travelers whose devices are searched by the border force.

However, without an Australia bill of rights, which would prevent laws that infringed privacy rights, the potential for data misuse will persist.


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