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Home News Apple antitrust trial kicks off with Tim Sweeney’s metaverse dreams

Apple antitrust trial kicks off with Tim Sweeney’s metaverse dreams

Document Analysis NLP IA

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sentiment

Sentiment0.095959595959596
objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.46406475468975
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.2843137254902

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Summary (IA Generated)

Epic Games launched its courtroom war against Apple in an extremely on-brand way: with CEO Tim Sweeney describing the metaverse from Neal Stephenson’s novel Snow Crash.

Sweeney called Fortnite ‘a phenomenon that transcends gaming’ The metaverse is Sweeney’s chosen metaphor for Fortnite, the battle royale game that Apple banned from its iOS App Store last year.

Epic sued in retaliation, and today, both companies delivered opening statements before Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers.

Epic put Sweeney on the stand for hours of exhaustively detailed questions about — among other things — Epic’s Unreal Engine, gaming consoles, the App Store, and what players do on Fortnite’s party island.

Epic’s legal team was responsible for asking questions that set up Sweeney’s statements, resulting in queries both extremely tailored (“How would you define the metaverse?”) and comically general (“Are you familiar with something called a ‘console’?”).

” Apple countered by calling Epic’s suit “a fundamental assault on Apple’s secure and integrated ecosystem.

Epic and Apple frame Epic’s demands very differently.

Epic mostly stuck to discussing its most moderate request: that Apple let developers process in-app purchases through their own systems, bypassing Apple’s fee.

Apple highlighted the most extreme ask: that Apple let iPhone owners side-load third-party app stores like the Epic Games Store.

But he hammered on Epic’s willingness to deal with gaming companies like Sony, who lock down their consoles in ways that Apple compares to the iPhone.

Sony, for instance, requires Epic to pay if a user plays Fortnite mostly on PlayStation but spends lots of money on another platform like PC.

But Sweeney and its attorneys have drawn a much finer distinction involving its business model, saying that console makers typically sell their hardware at a loss, so they have an incentive to treat developers better.

Epic will grill them about Apple’s business practices and whether it’s delivering on its promise of a safe, secure experience for developers and iOS users.

But Sweeney neatly laid out a more personal vision of the conflict: Fortnite is Epic’s answer to the web, and Apple wants 30 cents of every virtual dollar that an iPhone user spends in it.


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