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Home Family Why Is It So Hard to Be Evil in Video Games?

Why Is It So Hard to Be Evil in Video Games?

Document Analysis NLP IA

670
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3:21
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neutral
sentiment

Sentiment0.066756612290149
subjective
redaction

Subjectivity0.50348313272094
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.34913793103448

Highlights

RELEVANT
FREQ, RAKE or TFIDF
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PERSON
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Key Concepts (and relevance score)

Summary (IA Generated)

I have always loved the idea of choosing my own path in a game.

Moral dilemmas make virtual worlds more interesting.

I’ll replay a game with the intention of being bad, yet I find myself being a Good Samaritan again.

Megan Starks, senior narrative designer at Obsidian Entertainment, the game studio behind titles like The Outer Worlds, Tyranny, and Fallout: New Vegas, says about 97 percent of its players prefer to align with the good path over an evil one.

“We could say, ‘Well then, why bother making a less morally good path at all? That’s a lot of time and resources to develop a choice that most players won’t ever experience.

‘ But having the choice itself is what’s important,” Starks writes in an email.

“Fiction imitates life, and to create a believable world for an audience to immerse themselves in, it needs to contain some portrayal of a moral system,” Starks says.

When I think back to games like Black & White, Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, and Fable, there was no moral ambiguity.

It has a more pronounced impact, changing the way people in the game react to you, the way the central character Arthur Morgan carries himself, and how things end.

As games have matured, morality systems have grown more complex.

It might be choosing the least bad path, rather than the good path.

“If the choice is always easy, it becomes boring and also causes us to spend a lot of time developing content no one will experience,” Starks says.

While Obsidian’s data might show its players are often choosing the good path, that doesn’t mean all gamers are usually on the side of right.

A Baylor University study researched how people approach moral choices in video games and focused on three scenarios:.


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