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Home News This Is Your Brain Under Anesthesia

This Is Your Brain Under Anesthesia

Document Analysis NLP IA

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objective
redaction

Subjectivity0.43017225829726
probably it's an affirmation
Affirmation0.25842696629213

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Summary (IA Generated)

In earlier studies on brain implants in rodents and EEG readings from humans, Brown showed that propofol disrupts communication in the cortex.

But to push the science further, he and Miller wanted to record different regions simultaneously as an animal slips in and out of consciousness.

They wanted to use implanted electrodes to listen to individual neurons changing their tunes to get at how—and where—the brain’s complex communication breaks down under anesthesia.

These were stuck into four sections of their brains: three regions of the cortex and the thalamus.

(Neurons in a healthy, awake brain spike about 10 times per second.

” Millions of neurons communicate this way, at many different frequencies.

Higher frequencies went away, and neurons were left communing on a low-frequency channel.

That lunchroom chatter from an alert brain seems like noisy chaos, but it’s actually a coherent language of memories, feelings, and sensations.

The hum of anesthesia is clear, but it’s an information desert.

Propofol comes along like a sledgehammer,” Miller says, ‘and just knocks the brain into this low-frequency mode where none of that is possible anymore.

‘.

Miller and Brown suspected that the thalamus would be especially important for reinstating the rich chaos of being awake.

If the thalamus stops working, the theory goes, cortical waves can’t match their rhythms to communicate cohesive thoughts.

“And communication is everything in consciousness,” Miller says.

Once they had observed that anesthesia flattened communication from the thalamus, the researchers wanted to see if stimulating that brain area would bring back signs of conscious activity.


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